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01

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04

In the early days of computer animation, people used to ask us if the computer made the film. Fortunately, we’ve come a long way since then.

 

It’s been deeply gratifying to have our medium recognized for the art form that it is. In the more than ten years since the Museum of Modern Art in New York premiered Pixar: 20 Years of Animation, the exhibition has travelled around the world, throughout Europe, East Asia, Latin America, and Australia.

 

It’s been wonderful to bring this inside look at the studio to so many different countries and to see how enthusiastically everyone has greeted the work of our talented artists.

05

We’re very proud to present this exhibition, marking Pixar’s tricennial anniversary in 2016.  Pixar: 30 Years of Animation showcases artwork from each of our films—from our early short films and Toy Story through Inside Out and The Good Dinosaur.

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We’re incredibly proud of Pixar’s many talented artists, and we’re thrilled to present their work to you.

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01

Many people don’t realize that we have almost as many artists at Pixar working in traditional media—hand drawing, painting, pastels, sculpture—as we do in digital media. Most of their work takes place during the development of a project when we’re working out the story and the look of the film. The wealth of beautiful art created for each movie is rarely seen outside the studio, and the finished film we send around the world would never be possible without it.

02

Computer animation is both an extraordinarily liberating and extraordinarily challenging medium. While it contains no limits except those that you choose for yourself, it also contains nothing, down to the smallest detail, that you do not create yourself. You get nothing for free. 

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There are never any lucky accidents in the computer, only hard-won victories. So the development stage, the time before we build our digital world, is the time when we’re most free. We encourage our artists to explore as much as possible, to give their imaginations free rein. In turn, their art inspires our storytellers and filmmakers to new heights. 

Exhibition and Concerts

  PIXAR: 30 Years of Animation

During the COVID-19 pandemic, users of the social media app TikTok collaborated on musical numbers based on unconventional subjects, such as a grocery store. Earlier in 2020, TikTok users shared cooking videos accompanied by "Le Festin", a song from the Disney/Pixar film Ratatouille. Eventually TikTok users created parodies, including videos of lackluster cooking accompanied by a parody of "Le Festin" with fake French words.[3] In August 2020, Emily Jacobsen, an elementary school teacher, recorded an ode to Remy, the film's main character, among other TikTok video odes to fictional characters. The song went viral after Brittany Broski, a user with millions of followers, reused the music.[4] Two months later, in October, another user, Daniel Mertzlufft, who had previously achieved fame for his "grocery store musical" composition, adapted and arranged the short song as a Disney musical finale.

 

He composed the orchestration in Logic Pro X using software instruments he associated with Disney musicals—particularly the finale of The Hunchback of Notre Dame—including tremolo strings, French horn, trumpet, brass, timpani, and tubular bells. This video received over a million views and spawned thousands of subsequent TikTok videos in a collaboration between theater students and professionals expanding on the possibility of a Disney musical based on the Ratatouille film.

Subsequent videos repurposed prior contributions, such as the "Ode to Remy" lyrics and orchestration, to add new elements, like set design, choreography, and a playbill designed by artist Jess Siswick.[5] Using the TikTok "Duet" feature, users added vocal tracks atop each other to develop musical numbers. One of the most popular songs is a duet between Colette and Linguini sung by between Blake Rouse and Acacia Pressley, composed by Rouse. Others developed new numbers, such as "The Life of a Rat (Trash Is Our Treasure)" and "A Rat Is a Rat Is a Rat".

 

One contributor, R.J. Christian, created songs for multiple characters in the style of Alan Menken. American Broadway actor Andrew Barth Feldman of Dear Evan Hansen performed a song. Users created a central hub for the collaboration with 200,000 followers by mid-November 2020.[3] Disney Channel and Broadway actorKevin Chamberlin, even contributed a song titled "Anyone Can Cook" based on the catchphrase of the original film.

Disney responded to the fan activity with a video of Disney Channel actor Milo Manheim performing a submission for the musical at the site of a Ratatouille-themed ride at Walt Disney World.

Concerts/Musicals

Toy Story: The Musical is a rock musical based on the critically acclaimed Pixarfilm, Toy Story. The show was created by Walt Disney Creative Entertainment for Disney Cruise Line, replacing the earlier Hercules: The Muse-Ical. After a year of pre-production and workshops, it had a soft premiere on board the Disney Wonder in March 2008, with an official opening in April 2008. The show is performed in the Walt Disney Theatre, the grand showplace located on Deck 4. A land debut had been planned in the Hyperion Theater at Disney California Adventure Park in early 2011, however Disney's Aladdin: A Musical Spectacular was later extended indefinitely and no new premiere date for Toy Story was announced.

The show was directed by Los Angeles-based director, Stefan Novinski, and choreographed by New York-based choreographer, Warren Adams. Throughout the 55-minute musical, there are 6 original songs, written by Valerie Vigoda and Brendan Milburn. It also features one song from the original soundtrack of the animated feature, "You've Got A Friend In Me", written by Randy Newman. Music direction and arranging was handled by Los Angeles-based music director, David O.

The book was written by New-York based playwright, Mindi Dickstein, who penned the lyrics and book for "Little Women The Musical," on Broadway. Sets were designed by Los Angeles-based set designer, Sibyl Wickersheimer, costumes were created by Los Angeles-based avant-garde costumer, Ann Closs-Farley, lighting was designed by New York-based designer, Jason Kantrowitz, and sound design was by Los Angeles based designer Drew Dalzell.

Toy Story: The Musical, follows the film's storyline faithfully, with certain theatrical liberties taken, especially in the scenes involving the mutant toys and Sid.

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For Pixar Fans Only 2020-2021